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An estimated 3.8 million people experience concussions each year in the United States as a result of sports and physical activity
according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Research shows that women and girls suffer from a higher rate of sports concussions than men in similar sports. Additionally, of those athletes who undergo concussions, women experience different and more severe symptoms, and are often slower to recover from the injury. The Women’s Sports Safety Initiative, a special fund project of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, is dedicated to advancing the lives of women and girls by raising awareness of sports-related injuries and the unique factors affecting women’s susceptibility to and recovery from injury.

Women and Sports-Related Concussions

What You Need to Know

  • athletesWomen and girls suffer from a higher rate of sports concussions than men in similar sports.
  • runnersHormonal differences in males and females may play a role in determining concussion rates.
  • dizzy female athleteFemale concussed athletes report more symptoms of dizziness, fatigue, loss of concentration, and lightheadedness than male concussed athletes.

Hear from Mary Hayashi

Mary Hayashi, project director of the Women’s Sports Safety Initiative, discusses the need for more female-centered concussion research to determine why women concuss at a higher rate than men and how to protect female athletes from these injuries.